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Onlaska’s half–triathlon hosts area’s top athletes

The start is not like a race. Swimmers lined up and slowly walked across the rubber matting that starts their individual time, as they finish at the other end after the bike ride and run, they also cross that mat for a final accounting.The start is not like a race. Swimmers lined up and slowly walked across the rubber matting that starts their individual time, as they finish at the other end after the bike ride and run, they also cross that mat for a final accounting.

BY LEW VAIL
Enterprise staff
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ONALASKA – A triathlon is not a traditional race. While there is a starting line and a finish line, each person wears a leg bracelet and their individual time starts and ends when they cross the line to start and complete the event. The test is not to see who wins; the test is to finish in a better time than the previous event in which you competed.

Sunday's third Onalaska half triathlon began with cool, for September, temperatures and ended with high eighties on a typical summer afternoon. Medals and awards are presented on an almost individual basis.

Each person participates in an age group and so there are many "winners." With over 100 of the 135 who started out in the swim event finishing, there did not seem to be any losers.

While Snapp was not the fastest swimmer (Amosky was), he led the bike ride by only a minute or so. However, he did set a torrid pace in the run and took overall top honors in the event.

Amosky, the fastest swimmer, took fifth in the bike ride and fourth in the run, dropping him to third.